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Compare Gas Prices

Last updated: 13. 05. 2020

Compare Gas Prices
Comparing gas prices is quick and easy with usave. We keep an eye out for the best deals from the most popular energy suppliers (big and small), making it easy for you to save money. 

How do I compare gas prices?

All you need to do is go to our energy comparison engine, simply fill in a few details about your home, your approximate energy usage and about yourself. Our algorithm will do the rest and show you a wide range of quotes from the UK’s leading energy providers, including the Big Six (British Gas, E.ON, EDF, Npower, Scottish Power and SSE) and smaller independent companies. 
 
When you’ve chosen the best deal for you, just select ‘Apply now’ to finalise your purchase directly with the provider. Your energy supply will be swapped over automatically without any interruption to your service.

What kinds of tariffs can I get?

Standard Variable Rate Tariff
 
This is usually the default tariff. Your provider will probably have automatically reverted you to this tariff if you haven’t switched for a while. If you’re a new tenant in a rented property, then it’s likely that you’re on one of these tariffs too.
 
Standard Variable Rate Tariffs are the most expensive because the price per unit of energy changes twice a year, as regulated by Ofgem.
 
Fixed Rate Tariff
 
As the name suggests, a Fixed Rate Tariff means the cost per unit of energy will stay the same for the duration of the contract. To be clear, your bills may not be the same each month as you will still be charged for whatever energy you use. The main benefit is that you will be protected against price rises. Equally, though, you won’t be able to take advantage of price drops, and you may be charged an exit fee if you choose to leave the contract early.
 
Prepaid Tariff
 
A Prepaid Tariff lets you pay in advance for your gas usage, using a prepayment meter in your home or via their website. These tariffs can be more expensive per unit of energy than a Fixed Rate Tariff, but can be a good way to manage usage on a budget.

How can I reduce my gas bill?

There are several ways to make your home more energy efficient and reduce your gas bill. Unfortunately, these generally cost money and involve improvement or replacement of equipment, so you’re only likely to be able to do it if you are the homeowner.
 
  • Insulation: Unsurprisingly, a huge portion of energy use in the home goes towards heating rooms. You can help keep the heat inside by installing insulation, draft excluders and/or double-glazing.
  • New Boiler: You might consider getting a new, more energy-efficient boiler installed in your home, though this is one of the most expensive options. Maybe also have a look at getting a smart meter or smart thermostat (depending on your eligibility), which will help keep an eye on your energy consumption.
  • Government Assistance: There are also some government schemes, such as the Winter Fuel Payment and the Affordable Warmth Obligation, which can (depending on eligibility) give people financial assistance with their energy bills and/or with the overall energy efficiency of their home.

Should I be on a dual fuel tariff instead?

A dual fuel tariff means you get both your gas and electricity from the same supplier. This is often more convenient as it requires much less paperwork. This type of setup can also be cheaper, but not always so make sure you do some research into how much it could save you.

Which is cheaper, gas or electric?

Typically, gas is cheaper than electricity to buy per unit, but the cost of installing gas is often much more expensive. If your home doesn’t have gas, then consider how long you plan to be in the property, and whether or not it will be worth going through the personal and financial hassle of installing gas.

How long does it take to switch supply?

If you’re switching to one of the big suppliers, it should take no more than 17 days. With smaller suppliers it can take around 6 weeks. In both cases, you won’t have to get new infrastructure installed so long as you already have a gas supply; your new provider will simply use the structures that are already in place.
 
There is always a two week “cooling off” period during which you can change your mind and stop the switch.

Will I automatically get a smart meter when I switch?

Not necessarily, but it would be a good idea to request one if possible as they can help manage your usage. There is a national roll-out program that aims to ensure a minimum of 85% of UK homes have a smart meter installed by the end of 2024. So regardless of your supplier, you will likely be offered one soon.
Danny Lord

Author: Danny Lord

Danny is our Editor-in-Chief, and has been writing news and guides for comparison sites for the last five years.

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