Hyperoptic begins testing 10gbps home broadband

Hyperoptic, the self-proclaimed providers of the fastest residential broadband in the country has tested the “fastest home broadband the country has ever seen” at East Village in London.

The “hyperfast” broadband was connected to premises in the area via the providers current “full fibre” infrastructure rather than through a purpose built dedicated line. In this respect is it reminiscent of a similar trial undertaken by Gigaclear in 2015, although the latter only managed to achieve speeds of 5Gbps.

This new foray is very much in line with the ethos of Hyperoptic, who generally focus on linking their FTTB/P network to large residential and commercial premises with a high number of occupants. This tactic has awarded the provider with 400,000 connected buildings currently, this is expected to climb to 500,000 in 2019, 2 million in 2022 with the company planning to dramatically increase their customer base to cover 5 million premises by 2025.

The trial for the new 10Gbps capable line was carried out in conjunction with Get Living who are the owners of 1,500 dwellings in the East Village. The area has been open to the public since 2013 and Hyperoptic have been providing its occupants with high speeds of 1Gbps but the latest trial shows that there is potential for far greater speeds.

Hyperoptic CEO Dana Tobak, said:

“We have carried out this trial to elevate the debate in a largely stagnate industry. While the market incumbents focus on sweating their copper assets and lobbying the likes of the ASA to convince them that its acceptable to market their Fibre-to-the-Cabinet services as ‘fibre,’ we are proudly setting a new standard.

With full fibre our customers across 30 UK towns and cities can enjoy symmetrical gigabit services today. This 10Gb test proves that our network can scale in the future.”

Due to the nature of this speed test the trial was undertaken via a server located in Hyperoptic’s data centre and they used a top of the range 10Gbps capable router. So, while this may not show the speeds currently achievable for the average user, it does show the potential of Hyperoptic’s fibre lines and may pave the way for future endeavours despite being little more than a publicity stunt at this stage.

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